Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Incense Cones: Tutorial

I recently discovered the simple process of making incense cones, which gives me another way to use our abundance of Western Sage. They burn slowly and smell heavenly.

To make incense sticks, cones, molds, or trails, you first must begin with a finely powdered incense mixture called Makko.

Ingredients Needed:
Makko powder (approximately  60-70%)
Incense Resin (I used dried sage but plan on trying pine tree bark in my next batch), ground into a fine powder

Directions:
1. Grind each of your incense ingredients into a fine powder.


2. Sift your powder through a flour sifter, and combine all ingredients into a bowl.


3. Add Makko Powder, mix.



4. Add warm water, a little at a time. Knead your mixture as you work, creating a thick paste.


5. Continue to knead. You should be able to make roll your dough into a ball. Slowly add more water if the dough is too dry but do so very carefully because too much water quickly makes the mix too soupy and unworkable. Continue to knead.


6. Let dough sit overnight with a damp, covered with a damp towel.

7. Knead to dough again, adding more water if necessary.

8. Begin to shape your dough into cones. If  you like, you can create mini molds with paper.


9. Dry the cones by standing them up on a wax-paper covered board. Place the whole thing in a paper bag and scrunch closed. As soon as the outside of the cones are dry you can turn them on their sides to dry the bottom and inside. Check and turn several times daily.

Note: an added bonus of working with makko is that if your sticks, cones, or molds don’t burn well for any reason, you can simply grind it all back into powder again, adjust, test, wet, knead, form, dry, burn and enjoy – no waste!

Have Fun!

12 comments:

  1. In lieu of some of the water could you add a fragrance oil or essential oil if you are looking for a specific scent? This is brilliant btw!

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    Replies
    1. You'd use it in addition to the water, not in lieu of...but balance out the portions so that your paste isn't too watery. Generally speaking though, the powders you use should have some kind of scent, so not much oil is needed.

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  2. Genius! I had no idea I could do this myself. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's really, really easy once you have all the ingredients, and much less expensive than buying incense.

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  3. Can you use cinnamon and nutmeg as a scent...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't tried either of those myself, but I imagine you could. Maybe try a little before you make a whole batch. Given that people make cinnamon candles, it sounds like it'd smell great!

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  4. This was an excellent article to say the least. I really do appreciate this great information.

    Ganesh champa incense

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  5. Aren't you using anything as a combustible? I usually use a 10% addition of saltpeter or they just don't seem to want to burn. You DO have to be pretty precise with it or they burn too quickly and smoke. For further instruction, I recommend Scott Cunningham's book: Incense, Oils, and Brews. You will have more detailed instructions on amounts as well.

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  6. I clicked on the link for makko powder and it was blank so what is it and where can you find it, thanks, cool idea

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Here is another place to find it. Thanks for pointing out the blank link. I'll change it.
      https://www.heavenly-products.com/cart/index.php?cPath=191_381

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